August 2011

You are currently browsing the monthly archive for August 2011.

September is the month when students return to school so let’s look at records for education.

The first week of September we will examine resources that are available to help you with your research in England. The National Archives website has a section on the History of Education. You will find a list of information held at the archives.

On the right hand side of the webpage you will find a list of guides to help you with researching elementary, secondary, special services, teachers and technical and further education. You will find a section with useful links and relevant repositories. At the end of the page is a bibliography of further reading.

The Family History Library Catalogue (FHLC) is another place to look for information. Using the place search and the term England you get ten options for schools but none for education.

Colin R Chapman and Pauline M Litton wrote a book called “Using Education Records” in 1999 that may provide some assistance in researching English education records.

The second week we will look at the education records for Scotland. The National Archives of Scotland has a guide to explain education records and where to find them. They provide further reading suggestions.

The place search for Scotland in the FHLC has three options for schools.

Let’s examine Irish school records in the third week of September. The National Archives of Ireland provide a guide to sources on National Education. These records range from 1832 to 1924.

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland provides a brief outline of the types of records they hold with regards to education. The description suggests it is a very large record source.

Under the “Local History Series” leaflets you can download a PDF called “No. 5 – National School Records” which describes what is available.

The FHLC place search for Ireland has seven options for schools. You can order a microfilm called “Index of teachers qualifying at training college giving subjects in which qualified, 1893-1907 and of teachers competent to teach Irish, 1895-1912.”

When researching Irish school records do not forget about the Hedge Schools, there is a book written by Patrick John Dowling called “The hedge schools of Ireland” that may be able to help. You can find out more about them here.

The last week of September we will look at resources that are available to help you with your search in Canada. In Canada each province and territory is responsible for the education of their citizens.

Library and Archives Canada has a brief description of what is available there and they provide links to provinces and territories for more information.

Marian Press has written a book entitled “Education and Ontario Family History” that examines the records available for teachers and students in the Province of Ontario. The records range from 1785 to the early twentieth century. Marian looks at records available in both traditional and electronic repositories.

The FHLC has three options under Canada relating to schools.

Now that the kids are going back to school take a little time for yourself and research the education records of your ancestors.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

GeneaPopPop at Stardust ‘n’ Roots wrote a post this week called “Sears Catalogue of Genealogists” where he takes a humourous look at some of the different models of genealogists. Which one are you? Or can you choose just one?

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings had a post entitled “How do I catch up to 13 years of genealogy sloth?” He returns to a spreadsheet he created in 1998 and had added handwritten notes to the print out. He did not have the electronic file on his computer but he kept backups elsewhere and was able to find it and open the file. Now he has thirteen years to add to this document before he leaves on a research trip. The moral of his story “get better organized.”

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “Beyond the Walls of Your FHC.” They refer to a session given by Art Johnson at the 2011 BYU Family History Conference. It looks at the different places you can find the Family Search community.

Greta’s Genealogy Blog had a posting called “What I Learned Wednesday: Sometimes You Just Need to Clean House” where she describes how she spent the last week really doing a good clear out and cleaning. I always find clearing out the clutter to be a very freeing process and it seems Greta did as well. One big perk is all the extra free space you now have in the house.

Brenda Dougall Merriman had a post this week called “The GREAT BIG FAT WORLD TREE.” I am not going to describe the post here this is one you need to read for yourself.

Randy Seaver’s post called “Serendipity strikes again…and genealogy fun ensues” reminds us of how taking a little time out to just play and have fun while researching online can result in success.

Kerry Scott of Clue Wagon had a posting entitled “What To Do With a 547-Page Probate File.” She talks about finding an extremely large probate file and the frustrations of being able to get access to it in the Court House. She then looks at the problems of copying it and how inspiration can come in an instant. She will certainly have fun going through this file in the years to come. Congratulations on the new job Kerry!

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

These websites are actively remembering the efforts and recording the stories of military personnel involved in the conflicts of the 20th century. If your ancestor did not participate in the project you may find someone who served along side and learn something about their experiences during active service.

England

Captive Memories is a website that is home to an oral history project involving the 50,000 British servicemen who became Far East Prisoners of War in the Second World War. The dates they cover are December 1941 through March 1942. This is a database that you can search for interviews that were done of 62 FEPOWs. There are sections that provide links and other information.

There is the First World War Poetry Digital Archive which consists of collections of major poets of the time period, multimedia artifacts from the Imperial War Museum and an archive of over 6,500 items which were contributed to the project by the general public.

The Great War Archive not only has items relating to England but also some from Germany. Here you can find links to the Great War Archive Flickr Group, Europeana and Deutsche Nationalbibliothek.

The Imperial War Museum is a wealth of information for anyone doing research into the British military.

The Imperial War Museum has a Sound Archive that covers a broad range of experiences from the Boer War through the two World Wars and more modern conflicts. The recordings themselves are not available online but the catalogue will give you an idea of what is available at the Imperial War Museum.

There is a website in England dedicated to British Military Nurses and it provides information and links to help you with your research. She also has a blog called “This Intrepid Band” where she provides more information.

Canada

Dominion Institute and Canadian Heritage have a website called “The Memory Project” whose aim is to “explore over 90 years of military oral history, with firsthand accounts from the First World War through to the present day conflict in Afghanistan.” The website states that the stories were collected between 2003 and 2006. They have just received funding to start the Memory Project: Stories of the Korean War.

The Canadian Military Heritage Project provides links to websites to help with your research and it covers many different conflicts through the ages

United States

The Library of Congress in the United States has a similar project entitled “Experiencing War” from the Veterans History Project. There is an alphabetical listing of the participants.

Have you come across other websites that provide similar information? If so please leave a comment below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

If you are researching images relating to Canada have you tried the Auckland City Libraries?

They have an online database called “Heritage Images” and when using the search criteria of Canada you find there are seventy images to view.

You can choose the type of images you want to view: News & Newspapers; Research papers; Images; Reference sources; Books, and Magazines. Most of the images are late 19th and early 20th century.

There is an image for a grave marker for Samuel Morrin who was born 12 August 1842 in County of Two Mountains, Canada and died in Remuera Auckland on 15 April 1886. The County of Two Mountains is located in Quebec.

You can find an image for St. Paul’s church with the location being Ontario Canada.

There is a Canada Street in Auckland so you get a few images of the street in the search results.

Some references do not have images and this could be because they have not yet been digitized or for other reasons. You can find information on using and ordering images from the database here.

You never know where you might find information on your family. I wonder if someone is researching the Morrin family and do not know where Samuel ended up? If they find the Auckland City Libraries Heritage Images online he would not be a brick wall any more.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

Free Genealogy Resources had a very good post this past week entitled “Tuesday’s Tip: Act Like You’re Moving.” When you move you usually go through everything and sort it and during this process you may discover a few surprises you had forgotten about. They suggest doing this with your genealogy files to see what treasures you have that may have been forgotten.

Family Search’s Tech Tips had three posts that were of interest this past week.

James Tanner wrote “Online Geographic Resources for Genealogists” where he describes using the Family History Library Catalog to search for records relating to a place. Other websites are examined to see how they can help you with the geography side of genealogy.

He also wrote “A Further Look at Restoring Damaged Photographs” where he takes you through the process of restoring an old photograph.

Denise Barrett Olson wrote “Digital Publishing: The Living Book of the Dead” where she looks at family histories that have already been written and incorporating them into the updated family history that you want to write. She looks at the importance of respecting the work that has previously been done while working with modern research methods and today’s technology. You do not have to write a book there are many other ways to document your family’s story.

This week the Ancestry Insider looked at the Family History Library Catalog with a post called “The FHLC is No More.” The Family History Library Catalog has been renamed “the FamilySearch Catalog.” They have brought the new catalog up to date with the old one. They will eventually be updating the new catalog nightly. There are problems with how the search returns are viewed in the new catalog. Read this post to find out more.

Kerry Scott of Clue Wagon wrote a piece called “In Which I Say “Geni” and “Crap,” But Not In The Way You Think” which gives an important perspective into the recent changes at Geni.com. She looks at the real issues which are that not everything needs to go on the internet, you need to be very careful about what you put the internet and most importantly you need to be careful about using what you find on the internet. No Kerry, you are not the only one who gets hives at the thought of a Great Big World Tree.

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

There is a radio documentary called “History of the Irish Potato” on the RTÉ Radio 1 program “Documentary One.” It was first broadcast in 1984 and includes interviews with Theodora Fitzgibbon a famous traditional Irish cookbook writer. The documentary presents “the historic and sociological impact of the potato.”

The potato is important in Irish history. It is interesting to learn how it arrived in Ireland. You will discover how the potato blight affected the people of Ireland, about different cures for ailments using the potato, recipes and other fascinating facts about the history of the potato in Ireland.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

Kerry Scott of Clue Wagon wrote “In Which I Am Accosted By A Skeleton At 3 a.m.” where a cold and the desire not to disturb her husband’s sleep led to an all nighter and a discovery that may answer a few questions after a little more research.

Melissa Donovan of Writing Forward has a post entitled “9 Journal Writing Tools and Resources” where she shares online resources for journaling. The focus is on creativity and writing.

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “Coming Soon to a FamilySearch.org Near You.” They talk about the upcoming features of familysearch.org that were discussed at the 2011 BYU Family History Conference.

The Genealogy Insider blog is associated with Family Tree Magazine in the United States. They have a post entitled “Your Advice for Organizing Family Archives” which provides a list of reader’s suggestions on organizing your archival material.

The NLI Blog has a post written by Bean An Phoist called “Wanted: One strong, healthy young Man.” It takes a look at some of the newspapers to be found in the National Library of Ireland, the exciting find and acquisition of previously unknown issues of the “Nenagh News” and the fun to be had reading advertisements found in old newspapers.

The GenWriter, Julie Cahill Tarr, has a post this week called “4 Resources for Writing Your Family History” where she looks at three publications and a video to help you with the process.

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Patricia M. Van Skaik, Manager, History and Genealogy Department, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, was the keynote speaker at the Ontario Library Association Pre-Conference for the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference in 2010.

Her keynote address was called “Genealogy Data Buried in a Photograph: How One Library Brought Hidden Resources to Life.” The description of the lecture was “In 1848, Charles Fontayne and William Porter captured the earliest photographic representation of a city in North America. When 21st century technology was applied to the photograph, it revealed slices of life previously invisible to the naked eye. In addition, the Panorama links to a treasure of genealogical resources and has filled in research gaps for many family historians.”

It was very interesting to hear how they discovered the secrets hiding within the panorama. She left you wanting to learn more about what could be found in the panorama.

The Cincinnati Panorama of 1848 is now available to view online. When you click to explore the panorama you are taken to a section of the daguerreotype. If you click on Points of Interest you have several choices. Choose the point of interest you want to investigate further and you get a close up of the image.

One image has a point of interest called “Housework (Columbia Street between Ludlow and Lawrence Streets)” which shows laundry hanging on a makeshift clothes line and on the railings of the porch.

A point of interest on another image shows “Man with cart and a horse in the river (near Kentucky Shore).”

It would be nice if they had a transcript of Patricia’s keynote address to go along with this virtual library display.

If you have ancestors who lived in Cincinnati in 1848 this is a wonderful treasure to explore.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

These are my top five lists of books, blogs and websites that can assist you with your family history research in Scotland. Do you have any that you feel should be added? If so please leave a comment.

Books

The Gazetteer of Scotland 1882” by Rev. John Wilson published by Global Heritage Press

Tracing your Scottish Ancestry” by Kathleen B. Cory; revised and updated by Leslie Hodgson; published by Genealogical Publishing Co.

Discover Scottish Church Records” by Chris Paton; published by Unlock the Past Australia

Tracing your Scottish Family History” by Anthony Adolph; published by Firefly Books Ltd.

Scottish Local History: An Introductory Guide” by David Moody; published by Genealogical Publishing Co.

Blogs

Chris Paton: Walking in Eternity

Scottish GENES (GEnealogy News and EventS)

Scottish Genealogist Blog

The Scottish Military Research Group

Brenda Dougall Merriman’s Blog


Websites

ScotlandsPeople

National Library of Scotland – Post Office Directories

Scottish Emigration Database

National Library of Scotland – Maps of Scotland

Statistical Accounts of Scotland

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

Abigail Rieley wrote a post on the NLI blog entitled “Dancing Angels and Devilish Microfilm” where she describes with great feeling her memories of time spent in the National Library of Ireland. She looks at how it has changed over the years but in many ways still remains the same.

The Professional Descendant blog had a useful posting called “Using LibraryThing for Genealogy” where she goes through the process of putting her large library of genealogy books in the LibraryThing database.

Cassmob of Family History Across the Seas has a post called “The Irish population haemorrhage: mapping 160 years of data” where she describes using the new National Centre for Geocompuation’s Online Atlas Portal which contains 160 years of data on the population of Ireland. One section pertains to the famine comparing census years 1841 and 1851.

She also posted “JSTOR @ NLA: finding the historical context for family history.” This post describes the resource JSTOR and things she has found in JSTOR. The only problem is you need a library card from the National Library of Australia and to get that you need to live in Australia. Check out a major library in your area to see if they provide access to this wonderful resource.

Carole Riley of Genealogy in New South Wales had an interesting post called “How to search for probate files at the State Records NSW.” She describes how to research probate records and where to find the information.

Julie Cahill Tarr of the Genwriter blog has a post called “Find your Research Mojo” which provides motivators to help you rediscover your passion for genealogy.

Chris Paton of Scottish GENES had a post called “Overseas ScotlandsPeople promotion – free credits.” If you live overseas and are not already registered with the site then you are eligible for 30 free credits.

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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