June 2013

You are currently browsing the monthly archive for June 2013.

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “FamilySearch Image Restrictions” which looks at restrictions on the database images at FamilySearch. This is something we all need to be aware of when we do our research. These are only a few of the restrictions so be sure to read the information about the database before you start your research.

Irish Genealogy News has three items of interest. The first is “NAI issues tender for provision of Genealogy Service.” A tender has been put out by National Archives of Ireland for five researchers to work in the NAI Genealogy Service.

The next is “Remembering the 1913 Lock Out: lecture on video” here she provides a link to a lecture given by Michael D. Higgins, Uachtarán na hÉireann (President of Ireland) called “Remembering the 1913 Lock Out: It’s sources, impact and some lessons.”

The last is “County Clare archives to be placed online, free” which is very good news for all those with Clare ancestors.

The abroad in the yard blog had a post called “Snail DNA reveals ancient human journey from Pyrenees to Ireland 8,000 years ago.” DNA is something everyone has been talking about lately. This is a slightly different take on it as the DNA is from a snail and may have provided the necessary evidence about a migration to Ireland from Iberia “by Mesolithic coast-hugging sea travellers.”

British GENES blog has two posts of interest. The first is “Update on GRO Northern Ireland online records project” and the other is “PRONI User Forum – news highlights from meeting.” Both of these posts provide some interesting information on Northern Ireland research.

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter has a posted called “Please Put the 1921 Canadian Census Online” which is about a letter written to the Toronto Star “Letters to the Editor” section.

The Anglo-Celtic Connections blog has a different view point in a post entitled “Why I’m not signing the e-petitions.”

Geniaus has a post called “Future Family History” where she looks at personal blogs as a way of preserving our family history stories.

Organize Your Family History has a post entitled “Genealogy Roadshow coming to PBS this fall.” More details about the show have been released. This show is in its second season on RTÉ in Ireland. The first season was very successful so let’s hope the same can be said of its American counterpart.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

It has been a very busy spring for speaking engagements. It started in April with a full day workshop at Heritage Mississauga where I presented “Irish Research from a Far” and “Taking Your Irish Ancestors Back over the Pond.” Before I finished the day they had booked me again for October when the subject will be Scottish research.

The next week I was at the Ontario Genealogical Society Region III Annual Meeting in Cambridge. My topic there was “Why Can’t I find it Online? Other resources to help you with your research.”

A couple of days later I presented “A Brick Wall Chisel: The Cluster Research Project” at the monthly meeting for the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society.

Then it was a little time for me, well sort of, because I attended the National Genealogical Society Conference in Las Vegas. I was an official blogger and we had a great time. Since we were so close to Salt Lake City we took the opportunity to go and do some research in the Family History Library for a few days. A few days wasn’t long enough.

The week after I got home I presented “I Want to Research my Family History – Where do I Start?” at the Milton Senior Activity Centre.

Jane Watt representing Halton Peel Branch Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2013

The following week I was off to the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference where I presented “Scottish Research from a Far,” “Maiden Aunts of the Twentieth Century: A forgotten generation of women” and “A Brick Wall Chisel: The Cluster Research Project.”

Brooke Skelton representing Waterloo Region Branch Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2013

Last week was my last lecture of the spring speaking tour. I presented “Why Can’t I find it Online? Other resources to help you with your research” at the Quinte Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society in Trenton Ontario.

Quinte Branch OGS Trenton Ontario at the Quinte West Public Library

Now that summer is here I am already booking for the fall speaking tour. I will be presenting a full day Scottish workshop at Heritage Mississauga in October and in November I will be at the Hamilton Branch OGS General Meeting and the topic will be “The Genealogy GPS: How the Genealogical Proof Standard can help your research.”

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

As an FGS Ambassador we are provided with blogging prompts each month. Here are the responses to the questions we have been asked for June/July.

Deciding on the conference schedule depends very much on my selection of lectures which changes several times over the months prior to the conference. When the program first comes out I go through it and mark all the lectures that appeal to me. A few months later I will go through it again in a little more detail and narrow some streams down. Then a week or so before I leave I go through it for a final time and try to narrow it down to one lecture per stream.

Once I have narrowed the lectures down to hopefully one per stream, if not I hope that at least one of them is being recorded, then I decide on what exhibitors I want to visit during the conference. This can depend on what is of interest to me at the moment, new programs that have come out that I want to learn more about, new databases being released by the larger companies and sometimes it has to do with where the conference is being held and if I have any family connections to the area.

How I keep track of when and where I need to be usually starts with the small brochure that is included in our registration bag. I circle things and review the next day’s happenings the night before. In 2012 the FGS had an app that was very useful. I had it on my IPod Touch and could check at an instant where I needed to be. It made things very easy. I haven’t heard anything about this year’s app yet.

My schedule can change during the day at the conference because sometimes you are presented with an opportunity you can’t say no to or you meet up with some new friends and decide to try something different. Don’t schedule the whole conference before you go, be open to anything that may come up during conference. You never know what you might learn or who you may meet.

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved 

 

2013 FGS CONFERENCE EARLY-BIRD REGISTRATION ENDS JULY 1
“Journey through Generations” – A Conference for the Nation’s Genealogists

June 10, 2013 – Austin, TX. Discounted early-bird registration for the 2013 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference will continue only until July 1. Early registrants receive a $50 discount for the full four days, or a $20 discount for any single day. Details at FGS Conference.

The conference will be held 21-24 August 2013 in Fort Wayne, Indiana at the Grand Wayne Convention Center. This year’s conference theme is “Journey through Generations,” and the local hosts are the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) and the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana (ACGSI). Platinum sponsors are FamilySearch, FindMyPast.com and Ancestry.com.

The conference offers opportunities for all who are interested in researching their family history, with over 160 educational sessions on records, strategies, and tools for genealogists at all levels. The exhibit hall features over 70 vendors offering a wide range of genealogical products and is open and free to the public.

Luncheons, workshops and special events provide additional opportunities for networking and learning. Make sure the get your tickets to these conference “extras” early to guarantee your spot.

See you in Fort Wayne in August!

Learn More and Stay Connected

• Visit or subscribe to the FGS Conference Blog
• Like the conference on Facebook
• Follow the conference on Twitter and hashtag #FGS2013.
Visit Fort Wayne

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS Forum magazine (filled with articles pertaining to society management and genealogical news), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference — four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visit FGS.

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

The British GENES blog has a post entitled “National Records of Scotland website now up and running” which is great news. There is a lot of overlap from the other websites but it is a start.

Chris has another post called “1926 Northern Irish census – officially dead.” It has been confirmed that the census was destroyed in the Second World War. This is so sad as it is the first census after the partition.

There are two blog posts from the FGS Conference News Blog about the upcoming FGS Conference in Fort Wayne Indiana. The first is called “FGS 2013 June Conference Checklist” this is a list of things to make sure you do in June before the August FGS conference. The other is called “4th Conference Hotel Added” they have now added the Hyatt Place Fort Wayne to the list of conference hotels. This means that there is a lot of interest in this conference so start making your plans. I am an FGS Ambassador for the conference.

John Grenham’s Irish Times column has a post entitled “An opportunity missed?” which looks at the value of the Minister of Arts Heritage and the Gaeltacht announcement that the General Register Office indexes will be available online for free. It makes for interesting reading.

The Irish Genealogy News blog has three posts of interest. The first is “National Archives re-indexes online census.” The National Archives of Ireland says they have corrected about 12,600 errors in its online census database that were submitted by users. The site has been updated with the index corrections. Then she put an update which says that the person doing the corrections has moved on and they are on hold again until someone new can be found. I went in when the updates were first announced and noticed the index errors on my 2X Great Grandmother’s name had not be fixed. Then I see the blog update, so fingers crossed it won’t be long now.

The next post is “PRONI marks G8 summit with online exhibition.” I went in and check out the exhibition and it was interesting. Irish documents relating to each of the G8 countries. I so wanted to enlarge the 1864 Canadian passenger list page.

The last post is “Modesty (should) prevent me, but…” A shout out goes to Claire Santry for her mention in John Grenham’s Irish Roots column in the Irish Times. Well done Claire!

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “FamilySearch.org Search Futures” which looks at some upcoming search features.

The We Tree Genealogy Blog had a post entitled “Simplifying Your Online Genealogy Life.” She shares how she simplified her online presence.

Anglo-Celtic Connections has a post called “Ancestry.ca Bonanza” which lists all the new military and other Canadian records that have just been released. These are early records so they are very valuable.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

For immediate release

Over 2.5 million court registers added to findmypast.ie

Records dating back as far as 1842

Leading Irish family history website findmypast.ie has made an additional 2.5 million court records available to search online in its Irish Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 record set, which exposes the petty crimes Ireland’s residents committed and how they were punished.

The additions feature forty-four new courts in nineteen counties around Ireland. A further fifty-five courts have been supplemented with records from additional years. This brings the total Petty Sessions Court Registers on findmypast.ie to over 12 million records.

Notable new courts that have been added are the Limerick City Children’s Court and two courts with pre-famine records – Moynalty, Co. Meath and Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. As well as that, for the first time, seven new courts from Co. Longford have been added, bringing online over a quarter of a million new records for the county. Also well represented with totally new courts are Laois (five) and Cork (four).

Being drunk in a public place, being drunk in charge of a cart, failure to pay rent and allowing livestock to wander on the road are among some of the most common misdemeanors that our ancestors found themselves in court for. Although most defendants got away with a fine, the variety of cases heard gives a real flavour for life in Ireland at the time.

Cliona Weldon, General Manager of findmypast.ie, said “We are really excited about this add-on to our Petty Sessions court records. As usual, the stories you can find in them really paint a picture of what life was like in towns and villages in Ireland at the time. From harrowing stories in the Limerick City Children’s Court to amusing ones in Longford’s seven new courts, there is something for everyone in there”.

New courts have been added to the following counties: Clare, Cork, Donegal, Dublin, Galway, Kerry, Kildare, Laois, Limerick, Longford, Louth, Mayo, Meath, Monaghan, Offaly, Sligo, Tipperary, Waterford and Westmeath.

To find out if you have ancestors who had their day in court visit www.findmypast.ie

In the Irish Times on 4 Jun 2013 there is an article called “Newly discovered images of Edwardian Dublin’s Herbert Park Expo.” Lantern slides were found that include the expo and several other areas around Ireland such as Belfast and Newtown County Mayo. The Expo was a World’s Fair and one of the images is of a building with Canada written on it. I wonder if that was the Canadian exhibit at the Expo. These are lovely images.

The Church of Ireland Representative Church Body Library have digitized these images and made them available on their Archive of the Month page for June.

After you have viewed a slide show you can view the images again and find labels attached. Not many can identify the people in the images but they are interesting and focus on a particular time in Ireland.

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved