Ruth’s Recommendations

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Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The first is from Eneclann who have put online the slides and/or a synopsis of the 20×20 talks presented at the National Library of Ireland this summer.

A new blog called Brit-Ish Heritage Forum has a post entitled “Finally! Lancashire Ancestral Research Un-plugged!” which looks at the FamilySearch Wiki page for Lancashire and how they have made it easier to find records for church, chapel and parish registers online.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The National Archives blog had a post called “Discovery: the story so far” about their new catalogue called Discovery and how the upgrade is going.

The National Library of Ireland blog had two posts this week. The first was “My name is Jean, and I am a Family History Workshopaholic.” I can relate to Jean because I am a family history webinar and podcast “aholic.” It would be nice if the National Library of Ireland recorded these workshops as podcasts. This way we could all enjoy them no matter where we lived.

The other post was “Pettyfoggers and Vipers” which is about lawyers and the legal profession in Dublin. This is of interest to me as there are a lot of Dublin lawyers in my family history. This makes me want to take another trip to Dublin to see what else I can find.

Irish Genealogy News had two posts this week. The first was “TABs: missing parishes and corrections” which looks at the Tithe Applotment Books just released online by the National Archives of Ireland.

The second post is “Coming Soon….” which looks at the new databases that are to be released by the National Archives of Ireland and the timetable for their release.

Inside History Magazine blog has a new Q&A post called “Expert Q&A: Preserving your paper & photographic artefacts.”

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The Inside History blog has another Expert Q&A post called “Expert Q&A: How to research cemeteries in Sydney & NSW.” If you have people in this area then it is a good resource.

Now this is not a genealogy blog but the post was interesting. The Come Here to Me! blog is from Dublin Ireland. They had a posted called “Unusual Religions in the 1911 census.” The variety of different beliefs is wonderful. Who knew there were so many different beliefs in Dublin during that time period.

The In-Depth Genealogist blog has a post written by Jen Baldwin called “Filling the Void” where she found a void and decided to create something to fill it. Her new endeavour is very interesting.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The Ancestry Insider had a two part blog post on called “IGI Q and A” scroll down to see part one.

The National Archives blog had several posts this week that caught my eye. The first was called “James Bond, the Cold War diaries and spying in Kew” which looks at records that are available in case you have a James Bond in your family tree. The other is called “Swan Song” which talks about the young swans living in the grounds of the TNA. It is nice to know they have grown up and are getting ready to fly to new pastures.

The last post was “To keep or not to keep? Records appraisal and moving house.” This is a great post and makes you think about appraising the value of your household contents. This post makes me want to go through my family archives and appraise my documentation. Maybe I can create some space for new treasures.

John Reid of the Anglo-Celtic Connections blog announced he will be giving a presentation at the Who Do You Think You Are? Live show in London 22-24 February 2013.

If you are thinking about attending and have Irish research that needs to be done then you might like to join my genealogy tourism group “Touring the Research Trail in Dublin” which starts right after the Who Do You Think You Are? Live show.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the past several weeks.

The Library and Archives Canada Blog had a post called “How to Find Digitized Publications – Part II” They provide a list of Canada-wide and regional resources to help you find digitized publications. They have a link to part one of the post.

The FamilySearch Blog had a post called “New Digital Family History Books – July 2012 Report” which provides a list of new additions, over 700 of them, to the free Family History Books database. They even have a breakdown of books in a PDF document with hyperlinks: British Isles Books; Compiled Genealogy Books; International Books; and United States and Canada Books.

The National Archives announced the release of a Victorian Britain resource. The article is entitled “The National Archives and the V&A launch resource on Victorian Britain” It is to help teach primary school children about the Victorian era but we might find something new as well.

The Genealogy Canada blog had a post called “Talk Notes” about the availability of notes from talks presented to the Alberta Family History Society.

The British GENES blog has a post called “Concrete map of Scotland listed.” This is something I hadn’t heard of before and I find it very interesting. I am glad they decided to list it so that it isn’t lost.

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter has a post called “TLC Network Reported to Be in Talks to Pick Up “Who Do You Think You Are?” TV Show.” It is not definite yet but this is good news. Keep your fingers crossed a deal happens quickly and “Who Do You Think You Are?” is back on the air very soon.

The Inside History magazine blog has two posts of interest and they are both from the Q&A the magazine held on their Facebook page. They are: “Expert Q&A: Today’s toolkit for the digital historian” and “Expert Q&A: Using Trove for research.” They each provide quick tips, links and a transcript.

Brenda Dougall Merriman’s blog has a post called “No Surnames” where she helps you to work through the issue of lack of surnames in some areas of Europe.

John Reid of the Anglo-Celtic Connections blog as a post called “Canadian genealogy survey and “Canadians and their Past” which provides a brief synopsis of the BIFHSGO September meeting where they had Leighann Neilson from the Carleton University Sprott School of Business presenting some initial results from the Canadian Genealogy Survey that was taken last autumn. I can’t want to hear more about this survey.

This one isn’t from a blog. The Genealogy Society of Ireland posted this link on Facebook and I just had to share it. The Irish Times had an article entitled “Library seeks help to digitise collection.” The National Library of Ireland is hiring a company to digitise their collection of newspapers, parish records and other documents relating to genealogy. They are considering using a pay per view website to share the information. Let’s hope this happens quickly.

The National Archives of England blog has two posts. The first is “260 years of double-dating” which looks at the change over from the Gregorian to the Julian calendar in the 16th century. The other post is called “One Year On: leading the archives sector” which recognizes the first anniversary of when the National Archives took over the leadership roll from the former Museums, Libraries and Archives Council. It looks at all the changes that have taken place.

The ActiveHistory blog had a post called “The Day the Music Died: Remembering Same the Record Man.” This post recognizes the invaluable contribution of Sam Sniderman to the Canadian music industry. I used to go to the Sam the Record Man shop on Yonge Street. I would get the latest CHUM chart and then decide which ones to purchase. It brought back some lovely memories.

Marian’s Roots and Rambles had a post entitled “The Demise of Books?” In this post she looks at the possible demise of books due to the new technology. Schools are turning to eBooks for their textbooks instead of the actual book. This could be a good thing as it would be easier to keep the textbooks up to date. I am not so sure that all books are going that way yet. I love to be able to go to a book on my library shelf when I am doing research. I find it easier to search a hard copy book than an electronic one as the search capabilities are not always reliable in electronic books.

The Irish Genealogy News Blog has several posts relating to the Back to the Past show at the RDS (Royal Dublin Society) in Dublin. They are called “Back To Our Past gets underway in Dublin,” “Day Two at the Back To Our Past show” and “Back To Our Past 2012: Ancestry.” These are great posts and provide some wonderful new information on the release of records relating to Ireland. One day I hope to attend this show.

The National Archives of England blog has a post called “Toy stories: Peter Rabbit and friends.” It looks at the different toy registered designs that the archives hold. I love the picture of the stuffed Peter Rabbit that is first on the list.

The NLI Blog has a post called “YouTube It!” which talks about the National Library of Ireland video guides available on YouTube.

What were your favourite blog posts?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from the past two weeks.

Amy Coffin of The We Tree Genealogy Blog had a very funny posted entitled “If Genealogy Dominated Reality Television.”

Gena’s Genealogy blog had a post called “Women’s Research Resource: Labor Day Edition” which provides a list of resources to help you discover more about your female ancestors occupations.

Inside History is an Australian magazine. Their blog had a post called “NAA passenger records to be digitised & indexed” which is very good news if you have ancestors who went to Australia. The work will be done by Ancestry.com.au

Irish Genealogy News has some good news if you had a clergy ancestor who was with the Church of Ireland. Their post “Browse the 1852 Church of Ireland Directory online” explains it all.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

Genealogy Canada had a post called “TONI Is Growing Everyday!” TONI is The Ontario Name Index. The Ontario Genealogical Society is trying to create an index of every name found in any publication relating to Ontario.

Grow Your Own Family Tree has a post called “Ancestry launches Web Search in the UK.” They say that “Ancestry.co.uk has begun to index databases from other UK websites via Web Search.”

Geniaus has a post called “Clear Advice – Maybe not.” In this post she looks at using Evernote to take the place of Delicious.

The NLI blog has a post called “The Freeman’s Journal” It is the third in series of posts relating to the joint venture of the National Library of Ireland and the Newspaper & Periodical History Forum of Ireland. This post looks at the history of the Freeman’s Journal. It is important to know the history of a newspaper when you are doing newspaper research.

The Active History blog has a post this week called “Speak, Recipe: Reading Cookbooks as Life Stories.” I have always enjoyed reading cookbooks. This post provides a whole different outlook to the treasured and often ignored cookbooks found in kitchens around the world.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The Family Recorder had a post called “You know you’re a genealogist when…” It is very true and a few new ones were added in the comments section.

Irish Genealogy News has a post called “Cheaper digital options now available from Eneclann.” This is great news. I wonder how long it will take to have all their titles added to the digital catalogue.

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “Serendipity at the BYU Conference” which is a wonderful story of the magic of serendipity in genealogy. I wish something like that would happen to me sometimes.

The We Tree Genealogy Blog has a post called “1000!” Congratulations Amy on your 1000th post! I loved her look back at some of her posts.

Gena’s Genealogy blog has a post called “100 Social History Websites” What a plethora of websites to visit and add to my bookmarks!

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from the past two weeks.

The National Archives blog had three posts that were interesting. The first is called “Distress in the cotton districts 1863” which looks at the effects of the American Civil War on the cotton industry in North East England. This is of particular interest to me because I have family from Cheshire and Lancashire who were involved in the cotton industry. This post looks at the civil unrest caused by the shortage of raw cotton.

The next is “Is that all there is?” In this post the National Archives explain what they are doing to fix what they call “hopeless Wikipedia articles,” these are articles with little or no information.

The last post is “Olympics – PE kits and tuck boxes” it looks at a website called The Olympic Record. Here you can download records from the National Archives relating to the Olympics.

The Family Recorder blog has a post called “Those Places Thursday – The State of the Poor” which looks at a “useful source for family and local history” called “The State of the Poor, or An History of the Labouring Classes in England, from the Conquest to the Present Period; in which are particularly considered, Their Domestic Economy, with respect to their Diet, Dress, Fuel and Habitation; And the Various Plans which, from time to time, have been Proposed and Adopted, for the Relief of the Poor” by Sir Frederick Morton Eden. This document was published in 1797. This resource sounds very intriguing.

The Irish Genealogy News blog has a post called “Tipperary & Limerick witness statements released” which looks at the Tipperary and Limerick Witness Statements taken from the Bureau of Military History (1913-1931). These are personal accounts of the movement for Independence in Ireland.

What were your favourite blog posts in the last two weeks?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The University of Glasgow Library blog has a post called “Matriculation Index images on Flickr.” This is a set of images from the ledger of information on graduating students in the 19th century. The person who entered the names into the ledger got creative with the letters for each section.

Chris Paton of the British GENES blog has a post called “New book due soon – Discover Scottish Land Records.” This guide to Scottish land records will be a must have for anyone’s library. Congratulations on the new book Chris! I can’t wait to get my copy.

The FamilySearch blog has a post called “Capture Your Knowledge in the Research Wiki.” This post helps you to add your own knowledge to the Research Wiki at FamilySearch. The Wiki Support team is available to answer your questions. What information can you add to the FamilySearch Research Wiki?

The National Library of Ireland blog has a post called “Conserving our Newspapers” which takes you through the process of bringing an old newspaper back to life. There are pictures to show you the process and a before and after shot of a newspaper that has been revived.

Dick Eastman had a post this week called “Barking Up the Wrong Tree.” This is something we have all done and a lesson for new genealogists to learn before they make the same mistake.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

©2012 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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