Wednesday at the FGS Conference is focused on Societies and all the lectures are concentrated on helping societies to tweak and improve their services. I find the Society Day lectures to be helpful to anyone running a genealogy business. As a result I attended two lectures on Wednesday. The first was “Creating Master Databases from Local Genealogical Resources” by Dana Ann Palmer, CG. It was very informative and I will be using some of her tips in my local history projects.

The other lecture was “Avoiding the Pitfalls of a Society-Sponsored Research Trip” presented by Billie Stone Fogarty, MEd. This lecture provided societies with tips on whether or not to sponsor a research trip.

In the evening we attended the FGS Opening Social at Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory that was sponsored by Findmypast.com. It took a long time to get in but everyone in line was chatting and getting to know each other. There were jazz and country performers in a couple of areas around the conservatory. They served some light nibbles which were very tasty.

Then it was back to our room to get ready for the early start the next day.

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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The four of the last five days I have spent doing research at the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center and last night was the FamilySearch Blogger Dinner.

Congratulations go to Diane Loosle on being appointed Director of the Family History Library. She is going to be studying the “role of the Family History Library and 4,700 satellite branches worldwide called, Family History Centers, and how to make them discovery centers for people of all ages, not just a research facility.”

“In 2013-14, Diane says she has some very specific goals as the new director of the Family History Library:

1. Become more family and youth-oriented through providing interactive, discovery experiences.
2. Enhance the services of the Library through new collaborative research areas and better access to research staff.
3. Continue to bring the Library resources and staff knowledge to online patrons.
4. Engage more patrons from the geographic community surrounding the library.”

There are going to be youth and family oriented changes happening at the Family History Library. They are creating research collaboration spaces and staff is coming out from behind the desk and into these spaces. You will find computers, microfilm readers and staff in one space who are researching common interests.

There are 1.7 million names from historical records added to the website every day. The FamilySearch camera teams number 237 right now and their goal is to have 1000 in five years.

Family History Discovery Centers are going to be created in metropolitan areas in high tourist and high traffic neighbourhoods. They will be engaging for all age groups and knowledge bases. Three to five will be launched in the next twelve months.

Three Oral History Studios are being tested right now. You can bring a family member to the studio and interview them to capture their story. There is an HD video camera and you will be given a pre-programed flash drive to save the video. You are allotted an hour and fifteen minutes and the cost is $8 which is the cost of the flash drive. They need to pre-program the flash drive so you can’t bring your own.

FamilySearch Family Tree now has 950 million names, 41,686 are added every day and 27% are non LDS contributors. You will be able to upload documents by the end of the year.

Soon you will be able to scan your family photos at your local Family History Center. They will crop and upload your photos to your FamilySearch online account or you can bring them home and tag them.

Some of the FamilySearch third party apps are: FamilyMap, RootsMagic, Mobile Family Tree for iOS, Leaf, and Legacy mobile.

Rootstech are expecting 110,000 remote attendees in 2014. The BIG NEWS is that registration begins on Thursday 22 August 2013.

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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FGS2013_Ambassador_badge

If you haven’t registered for the FGS 2013 Conference yet, you still have time to register online, by mail or at the door. Mailed registrations must be postmarked by Friday, August 9. Online registration ends on Wednesday, August 14th. Pre-registering for the conference gives you access to some great benefits.

And don’t forget, if you have already registered for the conference, you still have time to get your tickets to the conference “extras.”

Only attendees who preregister for the conference can:
• Access the conference syllabus online prior to the conference.
• Guarantee a spot in the “extra” conference events (on-site tickets may be available to events if they have not sold out):
o 10 luncheons over the 4 conference days.
o 5 workshops over 3 days. There is still room in the Researching African Americans in University Libraries workshop. We have also added   extra spaces and still have a few seats left Researching Midwestern American Indians and Using Griffith’s Valuation to Identify Your Ancestors’ Origins. The other workshops are sold out.
o FGS Opening Social on Wednesday, August 21
o Friday Night at ACPL on August 23 with all proceeds going to the Preserve the Pensions Fund!
o Sunday Farewell Brunch with lots of door prizes.
• Register for a FREE genealogy consultation on Tuesday, August 20. You must sign up for a consultation in advance. See Conference Activities on the website for details.

You can also purchase extra tickets (except for workshops) for your non-genealogy spouses or friends who traveled with you to the conference.

Visit the website to register or add “extras” today. We hope to see you in Fort Wayne, August 21-24.

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Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

There are three posts of interest from Irish Genealogy News. The first is “Mount Lawrence cemetery: Phase 1 completes August” which is about the Limerick City Archives project to release the digitized burial registers for Mount Lawrence cemetery.

The next is “SeanRuad Townland Database has moved.” This is a very useful online database and thankfully someone has decided to host all the hard work of the late John Broderick.

The last post is “Familiar faces return to NAI Genealogy Service.” This is about the new consortium that has been created to provide a free genealogy advice service at the National Archives of Ireland. It was created by professional genealogists who had worked in the previous version of the Genealogy Service.

Dick Eastman is alerting us to “GenScriber 2.1.1” a free program for Windows to help transcribe many different kinds of records relating to your family history research.

John Grenham’s Irish Roots column in the Irish Times is called “Breaking up” and refers to the move of the GRO research room in Dublin.

This Intrepid Band has a post called “The ‘Burnt Records’” and it is a list of records that were destroyed the night the German’s bombed London in 1940. This is a very useful research tool for anyone researching the Great War in Britain.

The Empire Called and I Answered has a post called “Military periodicals online” which refers to the Army Lists from the British government. You can find a list of the periodicals to be found online at the Fibiwiki. FIBI is the Families in British India Society and they are very active in preserving documents.

Library and Archives Canada Blog has a posted entitled “The 1940 National Registration File” and this is a treasure not many people know about. I have used this several times and found some information that helped break down a few walls. Carefully read what is required to get a copy of the document.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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Findmypastie

FINDMYPAST.IE RELEASES IRELAND’S NATIONAL ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1921

RECORDS REVEAL DETAILS OF IRISHMEN WHO DIED DURING WORLD WAR I AND BEYOND

 

Leading Irish family history website, findmypast.ie has published online for the first time in its entirety Ireland’s National Roll of Honour 1914-1921.

These records give details of Irishmen, who died whilst serving in the British Army during the First World War. Also included are those soldiers who died in the three years after the end of the war.

The database of transcripts has been created from all known available resources for Irish casualties published before 1922, including publications like Soldiers Died in the Great War and Ireland’s Memorial Records, as well as organisations like The Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Newspaper articles, periodicals and other books were also used to collate the information. Furthermore, the material has been cross-referenced with the 1901 and 1911 Irish censuses to provide a more precise list of Irish war victims for the period than has ever been previously available to family historians.

Cliona Weldon, General Manager at findmypast.ie said “These records are a great addition to our collections, especially for anyone researching their military ancestors. The vivid details in the transcripts really bring home what the war heroes in our family trees went through in the field of battle”.

Supplementary information contained in the transcripts, including newspaper obituaries and letters home from the soldiers, bring these military records to life. One such harrowing letter home from the Front Line reads:

“Dear Sally-I am sorry to inform you of the death of poor Jackie. He was killed on the evening of the 27th February, and Goggin wounded. He was speaking to me about an hour before that. I am not in the better of it since. We were after coming out of the trenches, and back in billets when Jackie was killed. There was a big heavy shell came through the house and killed six and wounded twelve. Poor Jackie was made bits of-his legs and hands and head were blown away. His body was in an awful state. The shell also killed a Frenchman and his family”

With over 15,000 detailed entries searchable on findmypast.ie now and more to come, the National Roll of Honour 1914-1921 is a rich resource for those with Irish ancestors, who served in the British Army during the Great War and the years that followed.

This record set is also currently available on findmypast.com and findmypast.com.au as part of a World subscription and will be added to findmypast.co.uk soon.

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This is the last prompt for the FGS Ambassadors and it is a hard one. It is about packing for the FGS conference. The hard part is you never know exactly what to bring and you always think of something you should have brought once you get there.

It also depends on whether you are driving or flying. Obviously if you are flying you can’t bring as much as if you are packing your car. Personally I like to travel light.

The first thing that anyone who has ever attended a conference will tell you to pack is a comfortable pair of shoes and a wrap or sweater because the lecture rooms can sometimes be cold. I will add to that a refillable water bottle because you will need to stay hydrated and they usually provide water stations in the hall or lecture room where you can fill up your bottle.

A lot of people bring their IPads and computers to take notes but I have a hard time balancing them on my knee and typing at the same time, not as coordinated as some people. So I bring my notebook and pencil. They also come in handy when I’m researching. I can stand in the stacks and take notes using these tools.

The syllabus material will usually be put online before we leave for the conference so I go in and print off the handouts for the lectures I’m going to attend. I print on a single page and then use the back of it for notes for that particular lecture. This way I have both of them together.

I bring my little netbook as I find it easier to type on than my IPod. Yes, I said IPod as I don’t have an IPad. Facebook, Hotmail and Old Reader can be accessed on both devices but if I need to type up notes or a blog post the keyboard on the netbook easier to use. RootsMagic To-Go is my genealogy program of choice when travelling. The memory stick can be put into the netbook and my family tree is at my fingertips.

Business cards are always a must. I keep a small pile in behind my name tag so that they are easy to pull out when I meet someone new. Exchanging business cards is a good way to share contact information. Even if you don’t have a genealogy business you should get some cards made up with your contact information.

A list of exhibitors that are of interest is also made up. Usually I print out the map of the exhibit hall ahead of time and go in and circle where they are located so that it is easier to find them.

It can be a good idea to print off some small labels with your name and email address on them. These can be useful when you are entering draws. You can just peel one off and put it on the ballot. This is also great if there is a large crowd because it can be done quickly.

My research to-do-list is something that will be included in my suitcase. I have been working on it for several months. Will I be able to get it all done? Well that depends on my allocated research time. The list has been prioritized so that the things that are most important to my research will be done first. PERSI is available on Ancestry and when an article of interest is located I cut and paste the source information into my research plan. Easy and less chance of transcription errors.

Don’t forget to include the cables and chargers for your electrical devices when you pack. You don’t want something to run out of power just when you need it most.

Good luck with your packing and see you in a month!

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

John Grenham’s Irish Times column is entitled “Six tactics of the successful researcher:” We all need to be using John’s six tactics when we do our research.

The Genea-Musings blog has a post announcing Thomas MacEntee’s latest resource called “Hack Genealogy” Website Announcement.” Thomas has done it again. What would we do without him?

There are three posts regarding the move of the GRO research room in Dublin. British GENES has a post called “GRO Dublin search room to move” and Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter has a post called “General Register Office’s Dublin Research Room to Move to an “Appalling Location.” The final word, at the moment, goes to the Irish Genealogy News blog post called “GRO’s relocation is a ‘temporary’ one, we’re to believe.” Obviously we don’t. The move of the GRO research room from the lovely location in the Irish Life Centre to the not so lovely old dole office on Werburgh street does not seem to fit with the money the Irish government has spent on the Gathering and other tourism events to get the Irish Diaspora to come home and research their family history. I would not want to research in the old dole office.

Findmypast is in the news twice. The first is Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter with a post called “PERSI Finds New Home on FindMyPast.com” It seems that Findmypast has partnered with the Allen County Public Library to update and improve the PERSI experience. They plan to link digitized articles to the index references. This is great news.

The second post is on the Anglo-Celtic Connections blog entitled “Finally…Findmypast adds Canadian resources.” John Reid has listed the nearly 200 Canadian resources available on Findmypast.com

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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This is a special genealogy conference you won’t want to miss!

It’s getting closer! The 2013 FGS conference takes place in Fort Wayne, Indiana on August 21-24 with pre-conference activities on August 20th and a Farewell Brunch on August 25th. Fort Wayne is the home of the renowned Genealogy Center which is giving us generous extended research hours during the conference.

• Of course, you may still register online or by regular mail for the FGS 2013 Conference in Fort Wayne!

• Register soon so that in early August you gain access to the online conference syllabus with an expanded subject index.

• We tweaked room arrangements and have ample room for more people to sign up for the luncheons that take place each day.

• Rooms are available at the two added hotels. They will run periodic shuttles to the Grand Wayne Convention Center. Fort Wayne has thousands of hotel rooms so there is space for all of us.

• Ample parking is available near the convention center.

• Don’t forget about the wonderful quilt that will be awarded during the Friday evening festivities at the Allen County Public Library. That’s an evening to benefit the War of 1812 Preserve the Pensions Project with lots of fun activities. A dessert buffet will be sponsored by FamilySearch. If you have registered for that evening, you get access to the Genealogy Center from 6:00 p.m. till Midnight!

Want more details on these points and to keep up with breaking news? Follow us on:

The conference website
FGS Conference News Blog
Facebook
• Twitter: @FGSconference, #FGS2013

We hope you join us for this great educational and fun week.

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Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

Genealogy’s Star had two posts that were of interest. The first is “We don’t need to be genealogists anymore!!! Yippee!” which looks at the author’s reaction to the comment “we don’t need to be genealogists anymore.”

The second post is “Search Historical Newspapers with Elephind.com” which is about a new search engine dedicated to digitized newspapers.

Randy Seaver over at Genea-Musings is looking for help with a Canadian mystery in his family history. You can read more in the post called “My Canadian Mystery – Sarah Sephrona? (Fletcher) Kemp (1802-????)

The Paul Milner Genealogy blog has a post called “Tim Ellis Interview.” Tim Ellis is the Keeper of the Records of Scotland and Registrar General for Scotland.

The Library and Archives blog has a two part series on “How to read AMICUS records.” Part 1. Part 2.

The British GENES blog has two posts of interest. The first has a personal connection for me. “Paisley Abbey 850th anniversary conference” is about a conference being held on 7 Sept 2013 to celebrate Paisley Abbey’s anniversary. Paisley Abbey is the church where three different lines of my ancestor’s worshiped. I just wish I could go to the conference.

The other post is called “1939 National Identity Register (England/Wales) – digitisation test.” Chris found some items of interest in the latest annual report and accounts for 2012-13 for the National Archives at Kew.

John Grenham’s column in the Irish Times is entitled “Trees.” It provides warnings and food for thought.

Irish Genealogy News has a post called “New website and email facilities coming from GRO.” This is great news!

The National Archives of England blog has a post that relates to the imminent arrival of the newest Royal. The post is entitled “A Royal bundle of joy.”

Come Here to Me! has a posted called “Dublin Tenement Life.” There is a Facebook page called “Dublin Tenement Life” that covers inner-city Dublin from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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Image courtesy of [ nirots] / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

 

Happy July 4th everyone!

 

Remember while you are gathered with your family to ask questions and bring out photographs that you don’t know anything about in the hopes that someone attending the family gathering does know something.

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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